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Things to do before you[r project] die[s]

It’s no secret that all projects die, eventually, and that most projects die before they have had a chance to have any impact. This is true of personal projects, of open-source projects, of startup projects, of hardware projects, and more. A few days ago, the IoT project on which I was working did just that. It was funded, it was open-source, it was open-hardware, and it still died before having the opportunity to release anything useful. In our case, we got pretty far, didn’t run out of funds, and were a little polish away from putting our first alpha-testers in front of a pretty advanced prototype before a higher-level strategy pivot killed a number of projects at once. Ah, well, risks of the trade. Still, working on it, we managed to learn or come up with a few tricks to increase the chances of surviving at least long enough to release a product. I’ll try to summarize and explain some of these tricks here. Hopefully, if you have a project, regardless of funding and medium, you may find some of this summary useful.

Migrating again

While Hubpress is a cool project, I had no idea of what it could be doing with my password, so I have migrated to Hugo.

Extracting text from images is not easy (who would have guessed?)

At its core, Lighthouse is an idea we have been discussing in Connected Devices: can we build a device that will help people with partial or total vision disabilities? From there, we started a number of experiments. I figured out it was time to braindump some of them. Our problem Consider the following example: How do we get from this beautiful picture of Mozilla’s Paris office to the text “PRIDE and PREJUDICE”, “Jane Austen”, “Great Books”, “Great Prices”, “$9.

Blog migration in progress

I am in the process of migrating to github.io. You can find my previous blog on Wordpress.